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talks

Watch and Learn: Activity contagion in an online genealogy network (Foote, Lee)

Published:

In this paper, we use activity traces to try to cluster users based on their behavior in an online genealogy wiki. We treat the wiki as a community of practice, and based on legitimate peripheral participation theories we expect that people will start in peripheral roles before moving to more central roles.

RSiena and Stochastic Actor-Oriented Models

Published:

As a guest lecture in Seungyoon Lee’s seminar on Social Network Analysis I presented an overview and brief tutorial RSiena and actor-oriented network models more broadly.

Online Naturalization

Published:

I presented some of my research from my master’s thesis about how people change between roles in the genealogy community WeRelate. I also spoke about some of the benefits of using a shared, open source family tree for genealogy collaboration.

Wikis and work groups: A social network approach to predicting community growth (Foote, Shaw, Hill)

Published:

Large peer production projects, such as Wikipedia and open source software, work surprisingly well in creating useful, large scale, and high quality artifacts. However, the vast majority of peer production projects fail to gain contributors or contributions. Because network scholars have focused on the rare successful projects, there is very little research on the factors that predict project growth in the first place. We approach this question by examining the network structures and participation dynamics of a diverse population of peer production communities as they are just starting.

Wikis and work groups: A social network approach to predicting community growth (Foote, Shaw, Hill)

Published:

Both work groups and nascent peer production projects are composed of a small group of people, engaged in collaborative sense-making and knowledge production. The work group literature has found that dense, non-hierarchical interaction structures are associated with productive groups. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that these same structures would also lead to more productivity from new peer production communities. However, an analysis of 2,555 wiki communities shows that early interaction structures have very little impact on eventual productivity (as measured by total edits) or community growth (as measured by total contributors). Rather, a quickly growing group of active editors is a much better predictor of growth than the structure of interactions between them.

Starting online communities: Motivations and goals of wiki founders (Foote, Gergle, Shaw)

Published:

Abstract: Why do people start new online communities? Previous research has studied what helps communities to grow and what motivates contributors, but the reasons that people create new communities in the first place remain unclear. We present the results of a survey of over 300 founders of new communities on the online wiki hosting site Wikia.com. We analyze the motivations and goals of wiki creators, finding that founders have diverse reasons for starting wikis and diverse ways of defining their success. Many founders see their communities as occupying narrow topics, and neither seek nor expect a large group of contributors. We also find that founders with differing goals approach community building differently. We argue that community platform designers can create interfaces that support the diverse goals of founders more effectively.

teaching